Old and Sold- Vintage Historic Homes – Chicago

This week’s Old and Sold has some terrific Chicago single family homes of note!

Here are some photos:

2053 Seminary-vintage chicago real estate2053 Seminary

$1,925,000

2029 Seminary - chicago historic real estate

2029 N Seminary

$ 1,425,000

2319 Cleveland-chicago real estate

2319 N Cleveland

$1,290,000

2236 Carmen

2236 W Carmen

$935,000

1941 W Addison- North Center

1941 W Addison

$669,000

1761 Devon

1761 W Devon

$349,000

Virtual Home Tour

To see a tour of these homes (map and interior photos)

Select this link

Old and Sold Aug 19, 2014

Vintage / Historic Homes For Sale

 See Vintage – Historic Homes for Sale Today!

Select this link to see historic homes for sale in Chicago

To see homes currently for sale,

contact Anne Rossley

773-620-5333

Anne Rossley

Single Family Home Sales – 60640 – Chicago Real Estate

How’s the Chicago real estate market? How are single family home sales in the 60640 zip code of Chicago? Often, we track by neighborhood – Andersonville, Lakewood Balmoral, Edgewater, Uptown… For this article, I’d like to use 60640.  It incorporates the southern Edgewater/Northern Uptown/Eastern Lincoln Square Neighborhoods, and I think it makes sense for single family home buyers who’re looking just north of Lakeview and Lincoln Park.

See homes for sale with Anne Rossley –

contact her now!

Email Anne Rossley

Select this link to see homes for sale in 60640

And, to see a SNEAK PEEK home tour with interior photos of homes currently for sale, select this link!

Chicago 60640 zip code

Market Time

The market time for selling a home in 60640 is lower than the any time in the last 6 years.  Right now, homes average 69 days on market.

Median Sales Price

Median sales prices are up!  The highest median sales price recorded in this area was $740,000 – achieved both in April and October of 2009 (yes — higher than in 208!). Last month, sales hit $727,500 — 60640 has come back strong!!!

Inventory

Yes — inventory is LOW! That’s what’s helping to drive prices up, of course. Lots of traffic and demand, but little inventory.  In August, 2009, 13.9 months of homes were on the market. For the last 12 months, there have been less than 3 months worth of homes on the market – compared to a “stable” market of 6 months.

What this means for you…

If you’re buying – 

  • Pick and choose your home carefully. It’s not the percentage off list price that matters, but the price you pay compared to the 3 most similar recent sales within 1/2 mile of your house.
  • Use property alert systems to see when homes go on the market – be ready with your mortgage pre-approval ready to go.
  • Don’t wait, as much as you may be afraid that the good values are gone…  THEY’RE NOT! Appraisers can’t make you pay OVER the value – prices may be inching up, but they’re still great in general.
  • Pick an UGLY house! Homes that need a little cosmetic care – new carpet, paint, kitchen makeovers go for much less than shiny new pennies. Check out IKEA hacks for ways to cleverly redo a kitchen – a little “sweat equity” goes a long way to improving your investment!
  • Interest rates are still LOW, and they’re projected to rise. Since your monthly payment is largely due to the interest rate, take advantage of buying TODAY if at all possible.

If you’re selling – 

Pricing Notes: You still need to price your home AT the market, not over. This is critical for 2 reasons:

1.  The appraiser will only allow the bank to loan based on appraised price, not the amount you hope to get (or a buyer is stupid enough to offer). As they say, pigs get fat and hogs get slaughtered! Enticing a buyer to overpay by a large amount only results in cancelled contracts, angry buyers, and longer market times because the property has to be re-listed.

2.  By pricing AT the market, you may get buyers into a bidding war. This gives you a chance to get not just a great price, but a chance to negotiate the terms of your contract – the closing date you want, a quicker inspection time, and fewer requests for credits after the inspection. A happy buyer makes for a smooth transaction!

3.  Pricing your home at a fair market price means your home will sell quickly. I just sold a home in Sauganash where the sellers thought they’d have to get rid of the family bunny to stage their home. They were on a waiting list to give the bunny away, but VOILA! We sold the home in one day, to very excited buyers. While bunny went on a weekend visit to Michigan, she’s now safely ensconced back home and blissfully waiting to move to her new home. Selling quickly can save lots of headaches!

Realistic Expectations: Don’t think that everyone will buy your home just because there are fewer properties on the market. Today’s buyers are savvy and educated. Every property is different, and like always, the first 3 weeks your home is on the market is CRITICAL. If it doesn’t sell then, have a serious talk with your agent – something is wrong.  If you don’t get a contract in the first 3 weeks- your price is wrong, you’re not well staged, or something else is preventing you from enjoying a successful sale. In this market, if a home’s still available after 60 days, buyers think something is tragically wrong with it, and they may avoid even showing your home.

Here’s a list of homes sold in the 60640 zip code during the 3 months ending August 17, 2014
 AddressDateListSoldSFRmsBRLot SizeRehab?
1651Carmen5/23/14$260,000$326,00012405626X124X24X124No
1701Farragut6/23/14$449,900$449,90018008631 X 53No
1946Berwyn7/9/14$474,500$474,50004925 X 125No
1922Summerdale7/15/14$475,000$460,000106820825 X 126No
5333Lakewood8/4/14$699,000$635,000021938X123No
5221Wayne7/16/14$699,000$670,00019006837.5X123No
5427Magnolia8/1/14$699,900$670,0002395151031X123No
4890Paulina6/19/14$769,000$745,00048283101240 X 165Yes
1916Farragut8/8/14$819,900$808,000310018925 X 125No
4889Hermitage6/13/14$889,000$850,000022833 X 165Yes
4722Paulina6/19/14$939,000$975,000061038 X 183.3No
4613Hermitage6/11/14$975,000$972,5003600101025X160No
4550Paulina6/16/14$979,000$985,000360051025X165No
1338Carmen5/23/14$1,029,000$1,068,317360056840X150Yes
5064Ravenswood8/12/14$1,049,000$990,00041003925X151No
4910Hermitage8/4/14$1,100,000$1,085,000031125X165No
1352Winona5/23/14$1,200,000$1,163,00040001171130 X 125Yes
1718Gregory6/27/14$1,250,000$1,250,000011150X125Yes
1446Farragut7/14/14$1,399,000$1,310,0004500341235X125Yes

Along the Way…

 

Along the Way

a new type of post – some of the humorous and interesting things I come across when showing property. This was found while showing vintage condos and co-ops last week in the Gold Coast/Streeterville neighborhoods.

For the first in our series…

Best Toilet Seat Contender!

vintage toilet seat

This toilet seat stands out as an amusing focal point in the otherwise charming and original details of this 1920’s vintage bathroom.

Aside from the radiator, which needs to be painted, the remainder of the room is in immaculate condition – a lovely historic scene.

When did they offer these retro toilet seat gems?

Did you  or anyone you know sport one in YOUR throne room?

Send me your best toilet seat photos –

vintage, retro, or otherwise!

#besttoiletseats

Today’s search option – vintage condos in Streeterville

Select this link to find treasures in Streeterville vintage condos – currently for sale

and to see them,

contact

Anne Rossley

Baird & Warner

773-620-5333

#besttoiletseats

See Vintage Co-ops in Chicago

Vintage Condo Buildings in Chicago

Lakewood Balmoral Real Estate Update – August, 2014

Here’s the August Lakewood Balmoral Real Estate Update- to see homes for sale TODAY in this Andersonville historic district, select this link: Homes for Sale Today

Lakewood Balmoral District

Homes for Sale and Homes Sold

Lakewood Avenue in Andersonville

Lakewood Avenue in Andersonville

 See photos of homes in a CMA Tour by Selecting this link:

Lakewood Balmoral Historic District Tour

Homes for Sale

1339 N Catalpa

1339 N Catalpa

$599,000

 

Homes Closed

5221 N Wayne- Lakewood Balmoral5221 N Wayne

$670,000

5427 Magnolia

5427 N Magnolia

$670,000

5333 Lakewood

5333 N Lakewood

$635,000

Under Contract

5320 N Wayne

5320 N Wayne

$1,100,000

5507 Wayne- Lakewood Balmoral

5507 N Wayne

List Price- $ 1,399,000

5426 Lakewood

5426 N Lakewood

$724,000

 Get more information by viewing the table below,

or

Select this link for more details: LAKEWOOD BALMORAL August 2014

StatStreet #Str NameList PriceSold PrBRBALot Dim
ACTV1339Catalpa$599,00041.157X54
A/I5507Wayne$1,399,00043.137.5 X 123
A/I5426Lakewood$724,00042.137X125
PEND5320Wayne$1,100,00042.137.5 X 125
CLSD5221WAYNE$699,000$670,0004237.5X123
CLSD5427MAGNOLIA$699,900$670,00033.131X123
CLSD5333Lakewood$699,000$635,00043.238X123

Social Security – Happy 79th Anniversary

Social Security Anniversary – August 14, 1936

In a time when we wonder if Social Security benefits will be available for our children, I find it interesting to review the historic documents and “sales pitch” made to get Americans to take advantage of the Social Security benefits. Sometimes we forget that the depression/soup kitchen environment of our parents made the Social Security Administration a popular notion for supporting our aging Americans.

I strongly believe that we should act courageously to update the system for today’s economic times — this is NOT the America of 1936. The Act needs to be updated for the 2020’s and beyond!

 

This anniversary special is brought to you by your Seniors Real Estate Specialist,

Anne Rossley

773-620-5333

senior real estate specialist

 
“On August 14, 1935, the Social Security Act established a system of old-age benefits for workers, benefits for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, aid for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped.” 
Taken from the National Archives
 

Historic comics

social security comic

source: ssa.gov

Historic Social Security Facts – 1965

SSA Facts 1965 page 1

ssa facts page 2

ssa facts 1965 page 3

Historic Chicago Soup Kitchen

Soup Kitchen run by Al Capone

http://www.ssa.gov/history/acoffee.html

“During the Great Depression preceding the passage of the Social Security Act, “soup kitchens” provided the only meals some unemployed Americans had. This particular soup kitchen was sponsored by the Chicago gangster Al Capone.”
 

First Social Security Poster – 1936

 
Social Security Poster- 1936
 
 

Historic Photo

 
acardpun
 
This is a picture of a few of the hundreds of cardpunch operators SSA employed throughout the late 1930s and into the 1950s to maintain Social Security records in the days before the advent of computers.
 

Historic Photo – Signing the Social Security Act

August 14, 1936

 
FDR Signs Social Security Act

1. Rep. Jere Cooper (D-TN). Cooper was a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and would go on in subsequent years to become something of an expert on Social Security topics and he was a major force in Social Security legislative developments during the 1940s to the mid-1950s. Mr. Cooper also rose to the position of Chairman of the Ways & Means Committee during the Eighty-fourth and Eighty-fifth Congresses.

2. Rep. Claude Fuller (D-AR). Fuller was a member of the Ways & Means Committee and was generally opposed to the Administration’s bill. During Committee consideration he made motions seeking to strike key provisions of the legislation. But when his efforts failed, he compromised with the Administration and joined in voting for passage of the bill.

3 . Rep. Robert Doughton (D-NC) was chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. As such he was the principal official sponsor of the legislation in the House.

4. Rep. Frank Buck (D-CA) was a second-generation industrialist and fruit grower from California. He was a member of the House Ways & Means Committee, which had jurisdiction of the bill in the House. He graduated from Harvard Law School and served five terms in Congress, from 1933 until his death in 1942. (Representative Buck has often been misidentified in photos of the signing as being Edwin Witte. Witte, in fact, was not in the signing photographs.)

5. Rep. John Boehne, Jr.(D-IN) succeeded his father as a representative from Indiana. He was first swept into office in the 1932 elections with President Roosevelt and strongly supported FDR’s programs. At first, he was against the Social Security bill and wanted to exempt industrial employers with their own pension systems.

6 . Sen. Robert Wagner (D-NY) was born in Germany, immigrated to New York City, attended law school and was elected to the Senate in 1926. He served four terms. He was a close associate of Frances Perkins and helped draft several early New Deal measures. Wagner introduced the bill into the Senate. His son, Robert F. Wagner, was mayor of New York City for 16 years.

7 . Sen. Alben Barkley (D-KY) was a seven-term Congressman before being elected to the Senate in 1926. By 1937, he was Senate Majority Leader and a decade later, Vice President of the United States. He was an ardent New Dealer and helped shepherd the Social Security Act through the Senate. He argued for “a universal and uniform program in general.” He didn’t want to exempt certain private groups merely because they already had pension systems, as was proposed by some conservatives in the Congress.

8 . This individual is presently unknown. 

9 . Sen. Robert LaFollette, Jr., (PROG-WI) was the eldest son of Robert LaFollette, a progressive Senator from Wisconsin and one-time presidential candidate. When his father died in 1925, Robert Jr., then only 30 years old, was appointed to succeed him. Initially elected as a Republican, LaFollette changed his party affiliation to the Progressive Party in 1934. LaFollette served on the House-Senate conference committee that drafted the final version of the Social Security bill. He served in the Senate until 1946, when he was defeated by Joseph McCarthy. In 1953, LaFollette committed suicide in Washington, D.C.

10 . Rep. John Dingell, Sr. (D-MI). Rep. Dingell was a member of the House Ways & Means Committee. He was a prominent leader in Congress in sponsoring social insurance legislation and teamed with Senator Wagner he authored a couple of important precursor bills to the Social Security Act. (Several authors have identified Dingell as “unidentified man” in some versions of the signing photo.)

11. Sen. Augustine Lonergan (D-CT) was a native of Connecticut and a graduate of Yale University. Although he was a four-term Congressman, he served only one term in the Senate. During the discussions on the Social Security bill, Lonergan gave information about various private insurance annuities to show how they compared to the social insurance program that was being proposed.

12 . Frances Perkins was appointed Secretary of Labor in 1933, making her the first woman to hold a cabinet-level position. Like FDR, she was a child of privilege, but became a strong advocate for the poor and working class. She began her career in New York City as a social worker and held several responsible State government jobs. She served as head of Roosevelt’s Committee on Economic Security, set up in 1934. The Social Security legislation sprang from this committee.

13. Rep. Frank Crowther (R-NY) was a Republican member of the House Ways & Means Committee;

14. Sen. William H. King (D-UT). King was a conservative Democrat and member of the Senate Finance Committee. King expressed persistent opposition to many features of the bill as it was being considered, and his support of the legislation was in doubt until the last possible minute. In the end, he voted for passage of the Social Security Act. (Senators King and Harrison have often been confused in the signing photos, including,we are embarrassed to admit, in SSA’s own OASIS magazine. Clue: King has a bowtie, Harrison has a regular long tie.)

15. Rep. David J. Lewis (D-MD) was a member of the House Ways & Means Committee and was probably the leading expert on social insurance legislation on the Committee. It was Lewis, a former coal miner and self-taught lawyer, who introduced the Social Security bill into the House on January 17, 1935. However, Chairman Doughton, exercising what he took to be the Chairman’s privileges, made a copy of Lewis’ bill and submitted it himself. Then he persuaded the House clerk to give him a lower number than Lewis’ copy. Newspapers then began calling the bill “The Wagner-Doughton bill.” When Lewis found out, he sputtered and swore, then went to work to understand every sentence and master the arguments in favor of the bill. And when David Lewis walked down the aisle of the House to debate on the bill’s behalf, he received a standing ovation–a subtle rebuke to Chairman Doughton’s high-handed treatment.

16 . Sen. Byron Patton “Pat” Harrison (D-MS) was a Congressman for 8 years before being elected to the Senate in 1918. In his book “The Development of the Social Security Act,” Edwin Witte gives Harrison credit for his “adroit” handling of the Social Security bill in the Senate Finance Committee. According to Witte, Title II would not have been approved by the Committee without Sen. Harrison’s help. Harrison went on to serve in the Senate for the rest of his life and was elected President pro tempore 6 months before his death in June 1941. (In other versions of the signing photo, Sen. Harrison can be more clearly seen wearing a white suit and tie and holding his trademark cigar.)

17. Sen. Joseph Guffey (D-PA) was 65 years old at the time the Social Security Act was passed, although he was only a first-term Senator. From Pennsylvania, he served two terms before being defeated in 1946. His vote on the Social Security bill was in doubt until the final roll call.

18. Senator Edward Costigan (D-CO), a member of the Finance Committee.

19. Rep. Samuel B. Hill (D-WA) was a member of the House Ways & Means Committee.

20. Rep. Fred Vinson (D-KY) was a member of the House Ways & Means Committee. He would go on to serve as Secretary of the Treasury and as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

21 . President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

NOTE: For more biographical information on any of the members of Congress see the U. S. Senate Biographical Directory of the United States Congress on the Senate website

Old and Sold – Historic Homes in Chicago

These historic/vintage homes sold last week –

From Lincoln Park to Edgewater, these properties are over 100 years old.

Which one would you have liked to purchase?

Select this link to see photos of these homes – inside and out

 chicago real estate- 5359 Bowmanville

 5359 N Bowmanville

$475,500

old and sold-chicago real estate- anne rossley

1774 Highland

$590,000

5822 winthrop-old and sold-anne rossley

5822 N Winthrop

$717,000

chicago real estate-anne rossley

2109 W Bradley

$1,015,000

chicago real estate-anne rossley

4330 N Leavitt

$1,065,000

chicago real estate-anne rossley

4252 N Hermitage

$1,195,000

old and sold-anne rossley

865 N LaSalle

$1,260,000

Below is a table with information about these homes.

To download the information as a .pdf, select this link:  Old and Sold Aug 12, 2014

Street #Str NameClosedList PriceSold PrASF MT# RmsBedsBACarsYr BltLot Dimrehab?Bsmt
5359Bowmanville8/7/14$500,000$475,5001500$317.001510422189825X126NoUnfinished
1774HIGHLAND8/8/14$599,000$590,0003000$196.67124933.12190730X115NoFinished
5822Winthrop8/6/14$735,000$717,0003700$193.784414534UNK50 X 150YesUnfinished
2109Bradley8/8/14$1,100,000$1,015,00002610342.5189630X125YesFinished
4330Leavitt8/5/14$1,099,000$1,065,0003250$327.6941343.12.5190137.5 X 125YesFinished
4252Hermitage8/11/14$1,179,000$1,195,0003711$322.0221243.12188625X163YesFinished
865LaSalle8/8/14$1,299,800$1,260,0004000$315.00468833.12189116.86 X 138YesFinished

What Senior Retirement Communities DON’T tell you

Top 10 Things to Consider

when Choosing Senior Living Facilities

For those who are considering retirement communities instead of aging in place, Elizabeth O’Brien, in her NextAvenue article, recommends you do significant research, and beware the 10 things that these communities won’t tell you:

1.  They’re hard to tell apart – there are “want-driven” active communities, and then there are the need-based facilities, with independent, assisted, and nursing care step-up programs.

2. There’s no “doctor in the house”.

Senior Real Estate - Anne Rossley

3. Look beyond the fresh facade- e.g. what’s staff turnover like, what do the halls look like when it’s not “tour day?”,

4. Prepare for price increases and add-on services,

5. Realize that you may not be the ultimate decision-maker about when it’s time to move on – when you’re too frail to stay, they’ll give YOU notice!

Senior Real Estate - Anne Rossley6. Be careful not to become responsible for your parent’s bills (unless you’ve decided to take this on),

7. They prefer NOT to take Medicaid,

8. It’s hard to find TRUE quality ratings on these facilities- there’s not a great “Consumer Reports” or “Yelp!” for seniors (perhaps a new business venture?!)

9. Since “every night is “Saturday night”, STD rates are climbing at active senior developments- there’s more to do than just golf and bridge- just make sure to get regular health screenings!

10. Some of the fees may be tax-deductible – if they’re legitimate medical expenses, be sure to claim them on your tax returns.

This is not, of course, a comprehensive list. I think it’s a great article, however.

If you have other revelations to help find the perfect home for your aging parent, please leave your comments here.

Senior Real Estate

For all issues relating to

senior real estate, aging in place, or

finding your empty-nester dream home, contact

Anne Rossley

773-620-5333

Anne Rossley

Single Family Home Sales Lakeview – 60657

 

Lakeview

Single Family Home Sales

(60657)

What’s happening with Single Family Homes in the Lakeview 60657 zip code zone?

 

Before I go further — remember to call me when you need up to date market info — any time you need a market analysis for your home, I’m your gal!

Anne Rossley

773-620-5333

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 Median Sales Prices

Median Sales Prices are STRONG! They’ve ranged from $363,000 to $390,000 over the last 5 years, and in June, they hit the high water mark of $390K mark again.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 Market Time

Market times have dropped considerably – the high was 157 days on market (June, 2012) but today are down to 57 days — less than 2 months.

 

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 Inventory – Months Supply

This quick market time is due to the low inventory levels –

In May, 2010, there was a 10.9 month supply of homes available for sale.  Between January and Mary of 2014, there was only a  2.7 month supply.  With an increase in buyers looking to purchase, the great demand caused prices to increase.

Today, there is a 3 month supply of homes on the market.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 Find Homes for Sale in Lakeview’s 60657 zip code

homes for sale  Anne Rossley Real Estate

Select this link

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 

For Sale — 60657 in Lakeview

Below I’ve included a table of the 35 homes for sale as of August 10, 2014 (or if you’d like a pdf version of the table, you can select it here:  Lakeview homes for sale 8006 8057 aug 2014 )

#StreetList PriceSquare FeetPrice/SFBR
1629Wolfram$1,379,00005
3446JANSSEN$2,995,0006200$483.066
3407Greenview$569,0001800$316.113
1748Cornelia$678,0001600$423.753
3103Southport$699,9003185$219.754
3015Racine$899,0003100$290.004
1523Barry$939,0003800$247.114
3129Clifton$949,0003300$287.583
614Surf$1,095,00002
1732Nelson$1,199,00004
1726NELSON$1,325,00005
1513Wellington$1,445,0004200$344.054
3239Lakewood$1,449,00005
2834Paulina$1,499,9005000$299.986
1212Wellington$1,525,0004200$363.105
1746Fletcher$1,548,00006
1019GEORGE$1,575,00005
1136Barry$1,599,00005
1306Barry$1,599,00005
1503Wellington$1,699,0004200$404.525
3313Lakewood$1,800,0004200$428.575
1510School$1,800,0004800$375.005
1536Wellington$1,850,0005000$370.005
3528janssen$1,999,0006000$333.175
1216Eddy$1,999,99905
3251Lakewood$2,175,0005200$418.275
1439HENDERSON$2,195,0004800$457.296
550Oakdale$2,399,0007000$342.716
1225HENDERSON$2,399,0005400$444.265
3500Janssen$2,550,0006400$398.446
2861Paulina$2,700,0007093$380.664
1345WOLFRAM$2,850,0009050$314.926
333Barry$2,995,0006365$470.545
419Oakdale$2,995,0006800$440.448
1455OAKDALE$3,450,0007622$452.646

The following table includes single family home sales for the last 6 months. Note the price per square foot feature – if the listing agent included it, you can see the price per square foot — a great tool for evaluating home prices.

 

Sold – 60657 in Lakeview

Or, if you’d rather see a pdf version of the table, you can see it here: SF Home Sales -Lakeview 60657-6 months 

Status Closed DateList PriceSold Square
Feet
$/SF
PEND1331Nelson$791,0002700$292.96
PEND2965Sheridan$975,0004600$211.96
PEND1331Newport$1,149,0003850$298.44
PEND1341Barry$1,199,0003400$352.65
PEND1051Cornelia$1,259,0003925$320.76
PEND1642Nelson$1,500,0000
PEND1230HENDERSON$2,375,0000
PEND1716George$2,445,0006000$407.50
PEND1217Melrose$775,0003847$201.46
PEND1319Wolfram$789,0002300$343.04
PEND3248SOUTHPORT$1,049,0000
PEND1226GEORGE$1,179,0003600$327.50
PEND1516wellington$1,599,0004125$387.64
PEND1528Oakdale$1,660,0004200$395.24
PEND2825Pine Grove$1,785,0004958$360.02
PEND1130George$1,995,0000
PEND1757Nelson$1,999,0006000$333.17
PEND1330School$2,375,0004800$494.79
PEND1050WELLINGTON$2,395,0000
CLSD1633Wolfram7/30/14$400,000$500,0000
CLSD1738NEWPORT4/9/14$565,000$515,0000
CLSD1746Fletcher5/9/14$625,000$605,0000
CLSD3540HERMITAGE7/22/14$679,000$657,5000
CLSD1127Cornelia5/22/14$689,000$645,0000
CLSD3449PAULINA7/19/14$725,000$725,0000
CLSD1749NEWPORT6/17/14$749,900$760,0000
CLSD3051PAULINA5/21/14$775,000$783,5000
CLSD1731HENDERSON3/24/14$789,000$801,0000
CLSD832Wolfram7/8/14$799,900$745,0000
CLSD1327Wellington3/21/14$899,000$902,0000
CLSD3422Janssen4/11/14$929,000$940,0000
CLSD1340School6/30/14$929,000$950,0000
CLSD1215Nelson6/2/14$949,900$966,0003600$268.33
CLSD1541Wolfram7/31/14$999,000$999,0000
CLSD1516School7/15/14$1,125,000$1,095,0000
CLSD1536Nelson6/16/14$1,129,000$1,080,0003933$274.60
CLSD3236Lakewood7/1/14$1,225,000$1,205,0003708$324.97
CLSD3044GREENVIEW4/8/14$1,245,000$1,233,5005400$228.43
CLSD1336GEORGE5/1/14$1,274,900$1,225,0000
CLSD637SURF2/14/14$1,275,000$1,160,0003268$354.96
CLSD1711Wellington2/11/14$1,299,000$1,215,0004800$253.13
CLSD1025WELLINGTON8/8/14$1,325,000$1,278,5000
CLSD1719Wellington4/3/14$1,350,000$1,330,0000
CLSD1729BARRY4/1/14$1,374,500$1,376,0804000$344.02
CLSD1736Barry6/13/14$1,399,000$1,390,0004100$339.02
CLSD1622Nelson3/31/14$1,399,900$1,355,0000
CLSD1722Melrose6/23/14$1,465,000$1,450,0000
CLSD1215EDDY8/4/14$1,469,000$1,450,0003828$378.79
CLSD1753School6/5/14$1,475,000$1,425,0004200$339.29
CLSD629Melrose8/4/14$1,487,000$1,551,0000
CLSD2836PAULINA3/20/14$1,489,900$1,370,0005000$274.00
CLSD638Oakdale6/17/14$1,499,000$1,400,0003754$372.94
CLSD1244Eddy6/7/14$1,499,000$1,260,0000
CLSD3116Seminary4/29/14$1,525,000$1,497,5004200$356.55
CLSD1222nelson7/7/14$1,525,000$1,529,9944200$364.28
CLSD1531WELLINGTON6/8/14$1,549,000$1,415,0004200$336.90
CLSD1523Oakdale6/25/14$1,549,000$1,540,0004400$350.00
CLSD2845Racine4/15/14$1,550,000$1,500,0004200$357.14
CLSD1514Wellington7/18/14$1,585,000$1,565,0004200$372.62
CLSD1451Wolfram4/4/14$1,875,000$1,800,0000
CLSD1757SURF7/17/14$1,890,000$1,650,0000
CLSD1634SURF6/6/14$1,950,000$1,940,0006000$323.33
CLSD3048Kenmore5/30/14$1,999,000$1,818,0004500$404.00
CLSD1520George4/23/14$2,099,000$2,040,0000
CLSD1725Wolfram4/11/14$2,100,000$2,155,0004508$478.04
CLSD1432School5/2/14$2,300,000$2,205,0005000$441.00
CLSD1316Henderson4/7/14$2,399,000$2,275,0006000$379.17
CLSD1041Wellington7/8/14$2,899,000$2,650,0000
CLSD1111Wolfram6/27/14$2,900,000$2,700,0006600$409.09
CLSD1217Henderson7/15/14$2,995,000$2,600,0007000$371.43

 

 

 

Chicago Single Family Home Prices

Chicago single family home prices-

where have they been and where are they going?

The following chart shows median home prices for the city of Chicago — 2008 to 2014

The inventory of homes has dropped to almost nothing – this puts pressure on prices, causing them to rise. A “steady” market is 6 months of inventory.  It’s neither a buyer’s market nor a sellers’ market at 6 months.  Today, it’s a SELLERS’ MARKET!!

 

Here’s the Chicago inventory of homes (in months):

 

And, in raw NUMBER of sales, the units of single family homes sold in Chicago has risen dramatically:

 

Would you like to see these charts for your neighborhood?

Would you like to see the Market Insights Report for your area?

Email me

and ask for the report to be emailed to you –

one time or automatically each month!

Anne Rossley Chicago Real Estate Broker

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